Proper Turkey

Team Temple has officially entered a new class of citizen:

That class filled with people who cook Thanksgiving dinner for the family and serve it in their own home!

Happy customers after our first Thanksgiving at 3675!

Happy customers after our first Thanksgiving at 3675!

Yes! We are finally those people! I never thought I’d be one. I think back to the old days, when I was living above an old auto dealership in Detroit and most of my meals could be cooked AND eaten in a saucepan… I’d turn the oven on only to add extra heat to my apartment when the windows froze over…

Indeed: I HAVE grown up. It happens.

And cooking Thanksgiving dinner is not nearly as monumental a task as it always appeared to me as a kid (or a lazy college kid, or an apathetic 30-year-old). With the exception of obsessing for approximately one straight hour on Wednesday night over whether my brine was too strong, it was actually pretty low-stress. I mean, it wasn’t as hard as barbecuing tri tip for 20 people.

I documented our simple little feast to all hell and I’m blogging it so that next year, I remember what I did and can actually improve upon it. And also because I’m ridiculously proud – not gonna lie.

And no, I didn’t eat any of my own turkey. But I’m told it REALLY WAS good!

Next year, though, it will be as good as my cranberry-walnut bread stuffing.

BAM!

Brining Wednesday night! Turkey just fit in the pot, and pot just fit in the fridge. PHEW!

Brining Wednesday night! Turkey just fit in the pot, and pot just fit in the fridge. PHEW!

Out of the brine Thursday bright and early, and ready to spend the morning at rest in the fridge.

Out of the brine Thursday bright and early, and ready to spend the morning at rest in the fridge.

Basting that baby in olive oil, inside and out.

Basting our baby in olive oil, inside and out.

Trying to keep inquiring minds from wanting to know what's going on. All. Day. Long.

Trying to keep inquiring minds from wanting to know what’s going on. All. Day. Long.

Stuffed with herbs and veggies, bathed in wine, and ready to roast!

Stuffed with herbs and veggies, bathed in wine, and ready to roast!

2/3rds done. Final olive oil bath to work out the kinks from roasting breast-down.

2/3rds done. Final olive oil bath to work out the kinks from roasting breast-down.

We have reached the desired degree of "doneness!" Not too shabby for a first try – now for 30 more minutes of rest.

We have reached the desired degree of “doneness!” Not too shabby for a first try – now for 30 more minutes of rest.

Prepping everything else; potatoes, gravy, stuffing, bread, and a tasty recipe for green beans with shredded leeks and fresh dill.

Prepping everything else; potatoes, gravy, stuffing, bread, and a tasty recipe for green beans with shredded leeks and fresh dill.

Carving! We probably have some room for improvement here, but the meat made it into tummies so whatevz for now.

Carving! We probably have some room for improvement here, but the meat made it into tummies so whatevz for now.

Sitting down to eat. Thankful for food on our plates, a roof over our head, and family to share it with.

Sitting down to eat. Thankful for food on our plates, a roof over our head, and family to share it with.

••••••••••••••••••••

See all our pics of Thanksgiving 2014 here.

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One thought on “Proper Turkey

  1. Margaret Wisniewski says:

    I was dying to get the reviews on your “first” Thanksgiving meal! It looks and sounds like it was a success! And I would like the recipes for the turkey and the bread stuffing. Perhaps I will abandon “turkey in a box” and return to the good, old-fashioned way of cooking Thanksgiving dinner. The Thanksgiving meal is a ritual, as much as it is a meal. You may find that you enjoy the ritual and will want to continue. Or, maybe, take a year off, because it is a ton of work. (An electric knife may help with the turkey carving.) But, most important, it reminds us of how much we have for which to be thankful. Wish we could have been there with you. Love, Your Midwest Family

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